Archives : fluoride

Why You Need Filtered Water!

May 10th, 2017

 

Do you know what’s in your drinking water? According to the Natural Resources Defense Council, 77 million people across the US are drinking contaminated tap water. The EPA states “This is now forcing more people to figure out how and where to get clean drinking water.”  As US citizens, we are fortunate enough to have running water, but is your water “healthy”? From Flint, MI to Newark, NJ our drinking water is under siege as a result of cost-cutting budgets and careless disposal of waste.

You care about the food you eat and getting enough exercise, but have you considered the quality of water you drink?  High quality “healthy” water is just as, if not MORE important as high-quality, non-GMO food. Filtered water is no longer just a taste preference, but a necessity.

Even if you are lucky enough to live in an area with a cleaner water source there still may be chemicals present in the water. It is still important to consider investing in a water purification system.

The easy “solution” millions make is to buy bottled water, but can you really trust what you are drinking? Where does this water come from, how long has the water been in that plastic water bottle, what chemicals are leaching from the plastic, and are you recycling the plastic bottles? These are all important questions to consider when buying bottled water. 

Additionally, if you’re buying bottled water for its convenience and low price, you might want to reconsider.  A 40 pack of 16.9 oz. water bottles costs on average $3.98. That’s 5.28 gallons of water which works out to $0.75 per gallon. Remember this number; we’ll come back to it a bit later. To reach the recommended 64 oz. of water a day, each member of your household needs to drink four 16.9 oz. bottles. For a family of four, your 40 pack will last only 2.5 days.

If you’ve already made the decision that bottled water is not for you, you likely know there are many options on the market to filter your water including pitcher, sink and refrigerator filters.  However, there are fewer water purification options on the market. A purifier is more powerful than a filter. It’s like a super filter removing more contaminants than a standard filter, such as bacteria and viruses. Whichever option you choose, it’s important to do your research to truly understand what your water filter or purification system removes.

The Berkey system is a purifier meaning it will remove more heavy metals, pesticides, viruses, bacteria, and trihalomethanes, than a typical pitcher, sink or fridge filter. The technology that Berkey uses to purify water can handle the very smallest of water contaminants, even viruses, making it one of the most powerful water filtering systems available.

A common area of anxiety many experience when buying a filtration system is the initial cost.  Filter systems are typically less expensive for initial setup than purification systems, however, as you add up the cost and time to buy replacement filters every 1 to 3 months, they are actually substantially more expensive than a purification system, like the Berkey. Consider the average cost of bottled water is $0.75 per gallon (calculated above).  A Berkey filter’s cost is $0.02 per gallon ($107 cost / 6,000-gallon filter lifespan). That is 37 times less than bottled water! Let’s also consider the price of pitcher and faucet filter replacements. Typically, pitcher filter replacement cost $0.15 per gallon, as they last 40 gallons and cost $6.33 each. A Faucet filter is even more expensive at $0.18 per gallon, as they typically last 100 gallons and cost $18.99 each.  Compared to Berkey Filters both pitcher and faucet filters are 7.5 to 9 times more expensive. Also, take into consideration the lifespan of Berkey Filters (6,000 gallons) will last 150 to 160 times longer than pitcher and faucet filters.

Even though the initial set up cost for Berkey may seem pricey (systems start at $228) you will be saving more money and time than buying plastic water bottles, pitcher and faucet filters. With a Berkey Filter system, your water is a mere $0.02 per gallon for clean drinking water, and your filters will last for years, saving you valuable time!

With Berkey Filters you can now be in control of the water you drink.  Make the choice today to cut out unhealthy water and switch to Berkey Water; you won’t be disappointed!

Fluoride and Thyroid: Can Fluoride in Your Drinking Water Cause Thyroid Problems?

January 16th, 2013

According to the American Thyroid Association, more than 12 percent of Americans will develop a thyroid condition in their lifetime. Many Americans feel that this rate is higher than expected and that perhaps not only genetics are to blame. A quick search on the internet reveals many websites suggesting that fluoride, an additive in many community water systems, may be partially responsible for thyroid problems. Since January is Thyroid Awareness Month, it seems worthwhile to investigate whether fluoride affects the functioning of the thyroid.

What is the Thyroid?

The Thyroid Gland

The thyroid is a gland located in the middle of your lower neck, in front of your trachea (windpipe). Though it is small, the thyroid affects the major functions of your body by releasing the hormones, triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4). The thyroid gland uses iodine from your food to produce T3 and T4. These hormones affect growth and development, body temperature, and metabolism. T3 and T4 are necessary for brain development in infants and children as well.

Research Results

Studies of how fluoride may affect thyroid functioning have been ongoing since the early 1900s. In 2006, the National Research Council (NRC) released a report that reviews many studies about fluoride and thyroid problems. Numerous experiments have been performed on animals with varying results. While some did not show any effect of fluoride on thyroid functioning, a few studies of rats and mice showed decreased thyroid hormone levels and increased goiter development (swelling of the gland) at higher fluoride intake levels. The intake levels varied with each study. One interesting fact that was mentioned in a few of the studies was that high fluoride levels intensified the effects of the test subjects that were iodine-deficient. Remember that, as mentioned previously,  iodine is necessary to produce the thyroid hormones.

The NRC report also mentioned several studies that examined thyroid hormone levels in children in other countries with high fluoride levels in the drinking water. The conclusions of these studies were similar to several of the animal studies in that the scientists speculated that high fluoride levels may cause greater effects in low-iodine situations.

A Word of Caution

It is important to not rush to any conclusions about fluoride and thyroid issues. As the NRC mentions in the report, there are many inconsistencies in the studies that make them difficult to compare. The studies vary in:  1) types of test subjects used, 2) test concentrations of fluoride, 3) the types of measurements taken, such as hormone levels and occurrence of goiters, and 4) the types of effects observed. Scientists are not even certain how fluoride affects the thyroid gland. One theory that fluoride competes with iodide has been disproven. Clearly, more research is needed in this area.

Takeaway Message

Though the EPA has set limits for fluoride in drinking water, it is not known how much fluoride is necessary to cause effects in humans. If you already have a thyroid condition or are iodine-deficient, you might want to consult your doctor about limiting your exposure to fluoride. Visit the blog about Drinking Water Quality to learn about how you can discover how much fluoride is added to your drinking water.

 

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